Film multi-exposure fun / by scott stockwell

www.ss-photo.co.uk

I have quite a few shoots I still need to write blogs about, although I thought it was about time I did a blog post about what photography I do in my spare time. To those of you that know me you probably know I have a bit of a fascination with shooting film on older cameras. When I was younger I remember my dad buying me my first point and shoot film camera and taking shots of anything in front of me like film was infinite when really your only limited to 36 shots. Then having my film developed at boots to find half the pictures either blurry, underexposed or the flash has made your whole family look like red eye demons, which I think was quite a common family photo look back in the day. But this was all part of the fun of shooting film!

Any way back to what I have been up to with shooting film. I recently have been experimenting with multi-exposure photography. A lot of people some times do this by accident where they haven't wound on their film properly and have two images overlapping to give a ghostly double exposure frame. Most digital cameras now have this multi-exposure feature built in, this is not as fun as the film method. You can also quite easily do this in photoshop using two different images you find off google (cheating).

I wont go into explaining the technique but heres a wikipedia article on how it worksΒ https://goo.gl/m1iO7v, to put it in basic terms its shooting two shots on one frame so they overlap.Β The fun with shooting this on film is that you can't see how the two images are going to meet together, you really have to use your head to remember what part of the frame you took your previous shot. This is because the shadows and highlights of your first images will also effect how your second overlapping shot will show up on the next negative. Shadows will show more of your second shot while highlights will not show as well on the second images as this part of the negative is already exposed.

I have posted some images below (they are not photoshopped)

First image Agfa vista colour 200

IMG_20150830_0001 copy

Next 5 images Kodak Tri-x 400

Studio Session-683 Studio Session-685 Studio Session-686 Studio Session-692 Studio Session-693

last 5 images Ilford sfx 200

Studio Session-669 Studio Session-670 Studio Session-672 Studio Session-673 Studio Session-682