tri-x

Film multi-exposure fun by scott stockwell

www.ss-photo.co.uk

I have quite a few shoots I still need to write blogs about, although I thought it was about time I did a blog post about what photography I do in my spare time. To those of you that know me you probably know I have a bit of a fascination with shooting film on older cameras. When I was younger I remember my dad buying me my first point and shoot film camera and taking shots of anything in front of me like film was infinite when really your only limited to 36 shots. Then having my film developed at boots to find half the pictures either blurry, underexposed or the flash has made your whole family look like red eye demons, which I think was quite a common family photo look back in the day. But this was all part of the fun of shooting film!

Any way back to what I have been up to with shooting film. I recently have been experimenting with multi-exposure photography. A lot of people some times do this by accident where they haven't wound on their film properly and have two images overlapping to give a ghostly double exposure frame. Most digital cameras now have this multi-exposure feature built in, this is not as fun as the film method. You can also quite easily do this in photoshop using two different images you find off google (cheating).

I wont go into explaining the technique but heres a wikipedia article on how it works https://goo.gl/m1iO7v, to put it in basic terms its shooting two shots on one frame so they overlap. The fun with shooting this on film is that you can't see how the two images are going to meet together, you really have to use your head to remember what part of the frame you took your previous shot. This is because the shadows and highlights of your first images will also effect how your second overlapping shot will show up on the next negative. Shadows will show more of your second shot while highlights will not show as well on the second images as this part of the negative is already exposed.

I have posted some images below (they are not photoshopped)

First image Agfa vista colour 200

IMG_20150830_0001 copy

Next 5 images Kodak Tri-x 400

Studio Session-683 Studio Session-685 Studio Session-686 Studio Session-692 Studio Session-693

last 5 images Ilford sfx 200

Studio Session-669 Studio Session-670 Studio Session-672 Studio Session-673 Studio Session-682

Why I love the Nikon FE2 by scott stockwell

www.ss-photo.co.uk

Nikon FE2

I don't really write reviews (maybe I should), but the Nikon FE2 is probably one of my favourite 35mm film cameras I have shot with so far, why? Heres why.

Firstly its just so easy to use, simply pull out the film wind handle slightly & push the shutter button half way and your camera is already telling you what your recommended shutter speed is. The view finder is also really bright when your looking through the eye piece, almost crystal clear so its really easy to frame your shots. Want to push your exposure up by 1 stop? Easy, there is a small button which you hold down and clearly labelled -2 up to +2 on the ASA/ISO wheel which you simply just spin round. I also found the film really easy load with this camera less fiddly than other 35mm's I have used in the past and always seemed to hold on the spindle.

Most of all this camera just looks good, its covered in a somewhat faux leather materiel, almost as though the designers back in the 1983 were trying to impress a pimp. Its size is also nice, fits in the hand well and not to heavy, a bonus for any street photographers. Its construction feels really solid also, I bet I could drop this camera several times and not have many problems after.

Mostly what I love abut this camera is that the shutter speed goes up to 1/4000. Particularly useful if you wish to shoot wide open and take advantage of the shallow depth of field in the outdoors on a sunny day. When using a 400 speed film, most of the time I find with my other 35mm cameras like my Olympus OM10 it only shoots up to a speed of 1/1000 sec, you will have to use apertures of up to f/8 to stop any over exposure. With the Fe2 I would be able to safely shoot at f/4 as it shoots 2 stops faster. Only disadvantage to this of course is that it uses the batteries a lot faster.

I purchased the camera for just £33 (camera only) from Ebay and so far Im so happy I bought it. I develop black and white film myself and have put some of the results below. These were the two first rolls of film I shot with the FE2. They are shot with a mix of Kodak Tmax 100 & Tri-X 400 on a Nikon 50mm 1.8D lens. A few Images Below :)

03-18-2015_0 copy03-19-2015_33 copy03-18-2015_203-18-2015_503-18-2015_603-18-2015_1003-18-2015_1203-18-2015_25 copy03-18-2015_31 03-18-2015_28

www.ss-photo.co.uk